Gregory E. Oxford, DDS, MS, PhD  &  Isabell G. Oxford, DMD
100 Whetstone Place, Suite 308, St. Augustine, FL 32086  (904) 810-2345

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Posts for tag: common symptoms

By Oxford Dental Associates
February 17, 2013
Category: Oral Health
DoesMouthwashCureBadBreath

In our office, many of our patients are always asking us if over-the-counter (OTC) mouthwashes or mouthrinses are truly effective tools for curing bad breath. Unfortunately, nearly all of them merely mask any odorous smells temporarily — regardless of how refreshing they taste. There are mouthrinses available that are effective for treating gingivitis and tooth decay, but you must visit our office to obtain a proper diagnosis and a prescription for them. Reality is that a mouthrinse alone can't cure bad breath; however, there are products available that can make a positive impact on your dental health. The key is to match the right mouthrinse to your specific dental need.

  • OTC mouthrinses that contain about 0.05% sodium fluoride are an effective tool that when combined with good oral hygiene can significantly reduce the development of tooth decay.
  • OTC mouthrinses that contain alcohol, triclosan, sanguinaria extract, zinc and/or essential oils such as menthol can somewhat help reduce the bacteria in plaque, which in turn can reduce gum inflammation (gingivitis) and bad breath when used in combination with proper brushing and daily flossing.
  • Prescription mouthrinses containing chlorhexidine may be more effective in helping to control both gingivitis and tooth decay in certain circumstances. This is because chlorhexidine inhibits the formation of dental plaque by preventing bacteria from sticking to your teeth.

While bad breath may seem unbearable, it is often treatable. The key is to determine and then address what is causing your bad breath. A simple trip to our office for a proper exam, assessment and thorough cleaning along with improved oral hygiene may just do the trick. Contact us today to schedule a consultation for an examination and treatment plan.

Learn More

To learn more about mouthrinses, read the Dear Doctor article, “Mouthrinses.”

By Oxford Dental Associates
January 15, 2013
Category: Oral Health
CanAnythingBeDoneAboutMySnoring

Sleeping disorders impact people in different ways. For some people, they may feel they do not have a problem — except for the fact that their sleeping partner complains about their snoring. For others, they may know they have a snoring issue because they constantly wake themselves up gasping for air. This is a dangerous condition known as Obstructive Sleep Apnea OSA (“a” – without; “pnea” – breath). If any of these scenarios sound like your experience, then you may have OSA or another type of Sleep Related Breathing Disorder (SRBD). However, before jumping to conclusions, you need to obtain a thorough examination from a primary-care physician who is trained in sleep medicine in conjunction with our office. We have received training in the diagnosis and treatment of sleep disorders. But the good news is that sleep apnea is a treatable condition.

As for your question, yes, there are many things we can do to treat your snoring after the cause of your problem is properly established. One helpful approach is through the use of a specially designed oral appliance that we custom make and fit to your mouth. It is easy to use during sleep. Once in place, it will keep your lower jaw in a forward position so that your tongue is held forward to stop blocking your upper airway (i.e. the back of your throat and area causing your snoring and hindering your breathing while you sleep). Another option is to use a Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) machine. This specialized machine requires you to sleep with a mask that covers your mouth and/or nose. While you sleep, it delivers continuous pressure to your windpipe so that your tongue is forced away from your airway.

If your snoring is keeping you or your loved ones awake, we are a good place to start. Contact us today to discuss your questions about snoring or to schedule an appointment. You can also learn more about snoring and sleep disorders when you continue reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Sleep Disorders & Dentistry.”