Gregory E. Oxford, DDS, MS, PhD  &  Isabell G. Oxford, DMD
100 Whetstone Place, Suite 308, St. Augustine, FL 32086  (904) 810-2345

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Posts for: August, 2014

By Oxford Dental Associates
August 29, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: bridgework  
AFixedBridgeRemainsanEffectiveOptionforToothReplacement

If at all possible, we want to save a tooth — it’s the best outcome for your overall dental health. In many cases, we can achieve this by filling the tooth or installing a crown over it.

Unfortunately, preservation isn’t always possible if the natural tooth has been irreparably weakened by decay or trauma. Replacing the natural tooth with a life-like artificial one is the next best option: the replacement will help you regain lost function and reinvigorate your smile. Filling the missing tooth’s space also prevents neighboring teeth from drifting into it, causing further problems with function and appearance.

Dental implants are widely recognized as the best choice for tooth replacement because of their life-like qualities, durability and positive effect on bone health. Even their biggest drawback, their cost, isn’t that great an issue if you factor in their longevity — they may actually result in less dental expense over the long-term.

A dental implant, however, isn’t always a viable option. Some patients may not have enough bone mass to support an implant. Those with certain systemic diseases like uncontrolled diabetes or a weakened immune system may not be able to undergo dental implant surgery.

Fortunately, many of these patients can benefit from a fixed bridge, a restoration option that’s been used for decades. A bridge is a series of life-like crowns permanently joined like pickets in a fence. The middle crown known as the “pontic” fills the empty space left by the missing tooth. The crowns on either side of the pontic are permanently attached to the natural teeth that border the missing tooth space. Known also as “abutment” teeth, they serve as the support for the bridge.

Bridges do have one downside — the abutment teeth must be prepared by filing them down so the new crowns fit over them properly. This will permanently alter and possibly weaken the teeth. Dental implants, on the other hand, have little to no effect on adjacent teeth.

Still, a bridge remains an effective option for many people. Properly cared for, a bridge can restore function as well as enhance your smile for many years to come.

If you would like more information on bridgework as a restorative option, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Crowns & Bridgework.”


By Oxford Dental Associates
August 13, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
MatthewLewisAdultOrthodontics

If you haven't seen a recent picture of Matthew Lewis, the actor who played Neville Longbottom in all eight Harry Potter movies, you may be in for a surprise: It seems the plump, awkward teenager from Gryffindor has been magically transformed into a post-Hogwarts hunk. What kind of wizardry did it take to change his memorably snarled teeth into a leading man's sparkly smile? The kind skilled cosmetic dentists perform every day!

While special effects created some of the character's dental disarray, the actor's own teeth were far from perfect. And, as Lewis recently noted, the film studio urged him to postpone cosmetic dental work until the movies were all done. “It was something I'd always wanted to do, but it would have meant me wearing a brace for two years,” he told an interviewer with the Yorkshire Evening Post. “Warner Brothers said if I put it off until we'd finished filming they'd pay for it — and they did.”

There are plenty of people, like the twenty-something actor, who put off orthodontic treatment until after their teen years. If you're wondering whether there's still time to get orthodontic work done, then take heart — it's never too late to straighten your teeth!

Today, an estimated twenty percent of orthodontic patients are adults. Compliance with the orthodontic program (meaning thorough regular brushing and flossing, wearing elastics, etc.) is often less of an issue with adults than with teens. Plus, there are some options that can help ensure your orthodontic appliances will fit in with a more mature image.

One is colorless braces. In this system, the brackets (the parts that are bonded to the front teeth and hold the archwire) are made of a clear ceramic material that blends in with the tooth's natural color. This makes them hard to see unless you look closely. Inconspicuous yet effective, clear braces have been the first choice of many celebrities, such as Tom Cruise and Faith Hill... and lots of “regular” adults too.

Another option is lingual braces. These are truly invisible, because they attach behind the teeth (on the tongue side) instead of in front. They work just like the standard braces, and they're appropriate in many situations. However their cost is higher, and the space they occupy in the mouth may take the wearer a bit of time to get used to.

A third option is clear aligners. Unlike braces, which aren't normally removed until orthodontic treatment is nearly complete, clear aligners are easily removable. They consist of a series of transparent trays made of special plastic, which are worn over the teeth 22 hours per day. Each tray in the series is worn for a few weeks, and each moves the teeth a small amount; all together, they can accomplish a big change.

Aligners work well for correcting mild to moderate malocclusion (bite problems). Plus, you can temporarily remove them for important social occasions. But best of all, they're virtually undetectable — so whether or not you play the role of a wizard in the movies, you won't need a magic spell to make them invisible!

Which option is right for you? That's something we would be happy to discuss. If you would like more information about adult orthodontic treatment, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Orthodontics for the Older Adult.”


By Oxford Dental Associates
August 01, 2014
Category: Oral Health
IntroducingtheRoyalBabyandHisNewTeeth

Not long ago, a certain Royal Baby made his first major public appearance. At a “crawl-about” in New Zealand, young Prince George (the 8-month-old son of Prince William and Kate Middleton) was formally introduced to the world, along with a group of adorable tots and their proud parents. The press was quick to note not only the future King of England’s cute expressions and his determined crawling — but also the appearance of his first two tiny bottom teeth.

Congratulations, William and Kate — and now, it’s time to think about the taking care of those royal baby teeth. In fact, before you know it, it will be time for the age one dental visit. Why is this so important? Essentially, because proper dental care in the early years helps to establish routines that will lead to a lifetime of good oral health.

It’s a misconception to think that baby teeth aren’t important because they will be shed after a few years. In fact, not only do they have a vital function in a child’s ability to eat and speak properly — they also serve as guides for the proper development of the permanent teeth that will follow. So caring for a tot’s primary teeth is just as important as it is for grown-up teeth.

What’s the best way to do that? To prevent tooth decay, clean an infant’s gums after each feeding with a soft cloth moistened with water — and don’t let your baby go to sleep with a bottle in his or her mouth! When teeth appear, gently brush them with a soft-bristled toothbrush and a tiny dab of toothpaste. At around age two, your child can begin to learn how to brush — with your careful supervision and follow-up, of course.

Avoiding sugary and acidic drinks (including some fruit juices) is another excellent way to keep those tiny teeth healthy! If you do allow any sugar, limit it to mealtimes; this gives the saliva plenty of time to do its work of neutralizing the sugar and acid that can cause tooth decay.

And don’t forget the first visit to the dentist, which should take place by age one! Even at that early age, we’ll make sure your child (and you) feel comfortable in the dental office, and help you get started with the best oral hygiene practices. We will also check for signs of cavities, watch for developmental milestones, and screen for potential future problems.

If you have questions about caring for your young child’s teeth, please contact us or schedule an appointment. For more information, see the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Top 10 Oral Health Tips For Children” and “Age One Dental Visit.”